RSS = Really Simple Syndication. Or Rich Site Summary. Or RDF Site Summary. Great for SEO, Content Syndication, Getting the word out and being FRESH. Although this topic has faded in many peoples’ minds, the technology is still widely in use – just a bit more behind the scenes.

Posts

newspaper

Hot Content Ideas

Fresh, new and magnetic content is good for SEO and good for conversions. Finding inspiration for this content, however, can be a chore.

Google, the search engine, is one of the main entities that we want to take notice of our content. But Google, the monster engine of intent, is one of the main entities that we can use for the inspiration we seek.

Google News and Information Services

As we learned in The SEO of Search Trends, knowing what hot topics people are actually searching for can be extremely helpful for marketing in general, and SEO in particular.

Enter Google News and Information Services.

When someone hears a buzz or reads a headline that’s interesting in a newsworthy way, they’ll usually turn to a search engine like Google to find out more about it. Why not jump on the bandwagon and be one of the search results?

These Google Search services will help point you in the right direction of hot topics, provide citeable sources, and more.

  • Google News
    News from all over the web, collected into clusters; different perspectives on hot news topics. It’s really pretty cool.
  • Google Scholar
    Search Scholarly Journals, Articles & Patents, Legal Opinions & Journals and more for your research and citing.
  • Google Finance
    Google’s One-Stop shop for market analysis, business news, personal investment portfolio tracking and much more.
  • Google’s Knol
    Basically this is Google’s version of Wikipedia; a user-centered reference site. However the site has taken some strong criticisms for not being properly monitored.

Have a Google News and Information Service you think should be added to the list? Let me know.

RSS to Email

RSS to Email

The Problem with RSS

You really love your favorite RSS Reader / Feed Reader / Aggregator / etc., but it’s starting to get hairy; you’ve subscribed to so many of them that simply checking in with your reader seems to daunting a task these days.

Or perhaps you don’t use a feed reader; you prefer to sign up for Email newsletters instead. And you’re coming across cool websites that you’d like to subscribe to, but only see links for RSS.

Sound familiar? I know it does for me. Personally, I use to use Google Reader as my preferred online RSS Feed Reader, but it was discontinued back on July 1st, 2013, but they also provided a nice list of alternatives.

Aside from that, I also found myself commonly in both scenarios mentioned above.

RSS Readers: The Email Solution

Is there one? Yes indeed.

If you don’t have a feed aggregator, but are interested in learning more about them, check out this super-cool & super-detailed Compariosn of Feed Aggregators, by Wikipedia.

But if you’d simply like to Subscribe to a RSS Feed via Email, what to do? Some feeds are burned and hosted by Google’s FeedBurner, and sometimes there’s a link therein that allows you to do so. And often, there’s not.

Free RSS to Email Services

We’re talking about us – the end-user here; the ones who like to be notified of new articles or posts, etc. on our favorite websites. Not the email marketer trying to integrate RSS feeds into their newletters.

And believe it or not, there’s a few you can use for free!

Give ’em a shot!

RSS-SEO

RSS in SEO

RSS (Really Simple Syndication or RDF Site Summary, Rich Site Summary) Feeds can add to your SEO campaign.

Aside from being a great alternative way to receive updated content on your site, RSS feeds bring you closer into that hip Web 2.0 world.

And not to mention that Google looks for fresh content; having feeds ensure your people get your information in a timely manner, as well as the search engines.

What is RSS?

As Wikipedia says:

RSS (most commonly expanded as Really Simple Syndication) is a family of web feed formats used to publish frequently updated works—such as blog entries, news headlines, audio, and video—in a standardized format.

An RSS document (which is called a "feed," "web feed,"

or "channel") includes full or summarized text, plus metadata such as publishing dates and authorship.

This brought forth the term SLATES (Search, Links, Authorship, Tags, Extensions, Signalling) during that whole Web 2.0 time.

Web feeds benefit publishers by letting them syndicate content automatically.

They benefit readers who want to subscribe to timely updates from favored websites or to aggregate feeds from many sites into one place. RSS feeds can be read using software called an "RSS reader," "feed reader," or "News aggregator," which can be web-based, desktop-based, or mobile-device-based.

How do RSS feeds work?

RSS Video

Check out this cool and informative tool / video on RSS by CommonCraft.

Now…Spend some time optimizing the text in your RSS feeds just like you’d do for your pages and posts. Be sure to use descriptive, keyword targetted text in your titles and descriptions.

Now get out there and optimize your feeds, you SEO spider!

RSS Feed Readers

RSS Feed Readers

Updated for 2018!

Like many of you, I read a great many different blogs, and come across even more on a daily basis. Also like many of you, these add up to overwhelm. And so of course I searched…for some decent News Readers.

This morning, I came across a great Lifehacker post on the Best Newsreaders. After a polling, they came up with a list of Top 3 News Readers at the time.

But then in late 2018, while I was going through my Blog here and cleaning up posts, I decided to refresh this list a little bit.

Free RSS Readers

  1. Feedly
  2. The Old Reader
  3. Inoreader
  4. Feeder
  5. Flipboard
  6. Feedreader Online
  7. Google Reader (Web-Based) 🙁 Discontinued – Read Why Here🙁
  8. NetVibes (Web-Based)
  9. NetNewsWire (Mac OS X)

When I originally read that article, way back when, I was thrown off in regards to Google Reader. I’d been using Google Reader for years at that point, but was failing to regularly input it into my Daily habits, finding it evasive to remind myself to open a new window or tab, type in the url, and skim. For some reason, having a separate desktop application running in the background, that I can just ALT+TAB to, whenever I want, seems much easier.

But I thought to myself "All those Lifehacker readers can’t be wrong…I’m going to read Lifehacker’s post, Getting Good with Google Reader, and see if that helps…"

But reading on, into the comments after that post, I saw quite a few of the commneters were not so big on Google Reader, instead choosing others, such as SageRSS for Firefox and FeedDemon for Windows…Hmmm…Guess I was going to have to give them a try…Do they work with Google Chrome? Love me some Chrome, ya know.

Years later, in 2018, I find myself pretty busy and haven’t even thought about Feed Readers in quite some time. And now refreshing this post, and finding out that they are still around, some fairly new & slick, I think I just might have to dive in again. It helps to keep up 😉

RSS = Rich Site Summary = Really Simple Syndication = RDF Site Summary = Similar to Atom 😛